Sharktaco
elenamorelli:

{ the bench at the edge of the forest }

elenamorelli:

{ the bench at the edge of the forest }

Notes
Notes

whenever i try and learn something new

  1. me: It seems that I am not immediately excellent at this
  2. me:
  3. me:
  4. me:
  5. me:
  6. me: it is because I am a failure
  7. me: everything I touch dies
Notes

turquoisemoi:

thechicagolook:

octopusodyssey:

becausebirds:

An owl gets inside the house. The Owl Whisperer™ tries to get it back outside again. x

I like how he uses a swiffer mop to de-owl his house

JESUS CHRIST

I woulda just threw the swiffer mop outside when it was out the window fuck that

This guy literally handled the situation exactly how I would have 100%

Notes

If you’re anything like me, you spend countless hours binge-watching your favorite television shows, dancing to the songs that move you, and just generally consuming a lot of media.

That means that it is inevitable that some of the things you encounter and love are problematic. After all, we just don’t live in that feminist utopia we dream of (at least not yet).

So what are we do to do when we encounter something that we love that is also deeply problematic? When nearly everything we come across utilizes narratives about gender, race, and sexuality in ways we just aren’t down with as activists, what should we do?

There is no need to write yourself off for loving something that doesn’t fit into a feminist framework. You aren’t a bad person for loving a song with misogynist lyrics or for getting caught up in the latest season of Game of Thrones.

As the Social Justice League writes in their guide to being a fan of problematic things, we can expect texts to be problematic because they are created by humans, and the truth is that we are all imperfect.

However, it is still our responsibility as feminists to learn to consume that media responsibly.

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elenamorelli:

{ surrounded by nature }

Notes

tasnimsmentalroadtrip:

All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary
All of this is temporary

Notes

asylum-art:

Surreal Black And White Autoportraits by Luciana Urtiga

Brasilian photographer Luciana Urtiga does black and white selfportraits by associating surrealistic symbols such as split personality, substitution, extension or identity erasure. An abstract identity quest is to discover below.

Notes
Notes
Notes
  1. Early Feminists: Oh hey, we see that you can vote. We would like to vote also. I mean, since most of those laws effect us too and all.
  2. Men: YOU JUST WANT SUPERIORITY OVER MEN!
  3. Mid-century Feminists: Hey, that whole thing about how you can have careers and earn a living wage outside the home? Yes that sounds nice, we'd like the option to do that as well.
  4. Men: YOU WANT A MATRIARCHY, THAT'S WHAT YOU WANT!
  5. Late 20th century Feminists: Hey we would like to make our own choices about our reproductive health, just like you've always had.
  6. Men: YOU ARE TRYING TO TAKE MEN'S RIGHTS AWAY!
  7. Modern-day feminists: Hey, if you could you stop sexually assaulting/harassing us and them blaming us for it, that'd be pretty great.
  8. Men: THIS IS MISANDRY, MISANDRY I SAY! FEMINISTS HAVE GONE TOO FAR!
  9. Feminists: Um...
  10. Men: THE END OF MEN IS NIGH! MALE OPPRESSION IS REAL! THE MATRIARCHAL AGE IS UPON US!
Notes
S